Frequently Asked Question About Lasik

Indication

Q Who can benefit from LASIK?
A LASIK can be beneficial to all those who suffer from myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Candidates should have a strong desire to be less dependent on corrective lenses, should establish realistic expectations and should also understand the risks associated with the surgery.

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Q Who cannot undergo LASIK surgery?
A There are a number of factors that doctors must evaluate before determining the eligibility for LASIK. Some doctors deem certain preexisting conditions to be contraindications to the procedure and will not perform surgery if you have them. Sometimes, there are factors that preclude a patient from being an ideal candidate for LASIK surgery. In many cases, a surgeon may still be able to safely perform the procedure, given that the patient and physician have adequately discussed the risks and benefits and have set realistic expectations for the surgical results.

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Q If I am not eligible for LASIK, are there other options available to me?
A LASIK is one type of refractive surgery available to patients. Although you may not be eligible for LASIK, you may be eligible for a different procedure. You would need to discuss your options with your ophthalmologist.

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Q Can I have LASIK performed on both eyes at the same time?
A You can have bilateral simultaneous LASIK (both eyes are operated on at the same time). In fact, the practice is rather common. However, in some circumstances, surgeons or patients will determine that it is best to maintain a time gap before performing surgery on the other eye in order to evaluate the results. Hyperopic LASIK patients do not experience the rapid visual recovery that myopic patients do. Therefore, some surgeons prefer to operate separately on their eyes. Patients should discuss their options with their ophthalmologist.

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Q If I undergo the procedure on both eyes one at a time, what will my vision be like in between the first and second surgeries?
A There are a number of different options to help patients deal with their vision between procedures. Some patients who do not have bilateral surgery will begin wearing contact lens in the eye that has not undergone surgery. This practice gives them an opportunity to use both their eyes simultaneously. However, the contact lens will need to be removed at least 3 days prior to the second surgery. Others function by using the operated eye immediately without use of a contact lens in the other eye. This solution may work for nearsighted patients with a moderate refractive error (less than 6 diopters). A patient with a refractive error above 6 diopters who does not wear a contact lens may be unable to use both eyes together due to the large difference in refractive error between the eyes. Removing one lens from a pair of glasses is usually not useful. Doing so could cause double vision and eye strain.

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